Beer

Ross Worked With BeverageTradeNetwork on a Recent Article about Craft Beer Label Design and Requirements

Please click on the following link on BeverageTradeNetwork to read the recent article in which Ross was consulted regarding craft beer label design. The article discusses the process and requirements for label approval, prohibited content on malt beverage labels and why you might consider plans for brewery expansion when designing a label. Let us know if you have any questions or comments!

http://beveragetradenetwork.com/en/article-base/craft-beer-label-design-how-to-adhere-to-state-and-federal-law-and-get-your-labels-approved–351.htm

By |June 9th, 2014|Blog, News|0 Comments

It’s Kind of Their Thing

Anheuser Busch is doing that thing Anheuser Busch does. This time in South Carolina. It’s what they recently did in Florida. Here, they had some politicians that were either willing to do their bidding or were willing to accept vague and unsupported assertions as fact without asking any logical follow-up questions. In South Carolina, they’ve got their lawyer-lobbyists doing the same.

ABInBev’s attorneys wrote a short letter to South Carolina Senators asking that they “please non-concur”  with house amendments to the bill that was drafted to help open up the craft beer industry in South Carolina and perhaps provide incentive to Stone Brewing to bring jobs and money to South Carolina. Read that letter here: (as posted by Wesley Donehue and BeerOfSC) http://www.scribd.com/doc/224630184/Stone-Bill.

The attorneys begin by noting that “the manner in which the law would be changed would be detrimental to the current three tier system for alcohol distribution.” It is […]

By |May 19th, 2014|Blog|0 Comments

SB 1714 Update – A Total Farce

UPDATE: I mentioned in the last update that this process should have been much easier given that Florida’s brewers are looking for simple, common sense, measures to be taken. Those would be legalization of the 64 ounce growler and malt beverage tastings conducted by brewers.  Senator Gibson filed a delete all, discussed further below, that would return any debate back to the simplicity necessary and simply allow 64 ounce containers and beer tastings. Senator Thrasher did not want Gibson bringing what was essentially old business (bills stuck in Committee). Her amendment was withdrawn. Simplicity and common sense did not rule the day.

Senator Stargel filed an amendment on Sunday night that would keep unnecessary restrictions but simply ease those restrictions. It would:

  • Allow a brewery to have one vendors license on each brewery premises.
  • Allow sales for off premises consumption in sealed containers over 2,000 kegs so long as it does not top 20% […]
By |April 28th, 2014|Blog|0 Comments

Trademark Series: The Doctrine of Foreign Equivalents

From time to time, we run into proposed trademarks that are in another language. This generally starts a conversation about the doctrine of foreign equivalents. The doctrine of foreign equivalents requires that foreign words be translated into English to determine if there is a likelihood of consumer confusion with a mark already registered or to determine if the applied-for mark is descriptive or generic. When applicants apply for a mark in a different language, they are expected to provide the translation of the mark or else the examining attorney will seek the relevance of the applied-for mark.

There is often question about when the doctrine is applied.  It’s applied when the “ordinary American purchaser” would “stop and translate” the foreign wording in a mark. That isn’t terribly helpful on its own.  It has been clarified that the “ordinary American purchaser” isn’t the average American, but rather is […]

By |April 18th, 2014|Blog|0 Comments

Flawed Logic

A couple more articles were published today regarding the beer legislation in Florida’s Senate. One of the articles is from Michigan. While there are people learning and writing about the ridiculous nature of the legislation in other markets, it still seems that some of those in the Senate still don’t truly understand the relevant context of the legislation.

According to one article, Senator Kelli Stargel, the sponsor of SB 1714, said the craft industry has thrived under the exception originally created to allow Busch Gardens to sell its beer directly to consumers. The thriving craft beer industry means more taxes collected by the State of Florida. More importantly, the exception was created to promote tourism, not to promote only Busch Gardens. The exception never specifies theme parks or theme parks developed by Anheuser-Busch. There is a reason for that. Tourism is good for Florida and its economy whether […]

By |April 15th, 2014|Blog|0 Comments

Come-To-Rest Exception

Florida likes to collect taxes. They want to ensure they get all of them. That’s not a Florida thing. Every government wants what they perceive to be theirs and every government wants to collect revenues.  Florida ranks in the top 10 in the United States in state excise tax rates on beer.  But a funny thing happened on the way to the bank: The Florida Senate’s Committee on Regulated Industries (chaired by Senator Kelli Stargel) introduced a bill that would remove one of the very requirements that purportedly exists to control and monitor that tax revenue. That requirement is the come-to-rest requirement (proper record keeping and thus proper tax collection is easier to verify with checks and balances).

On Tuesday, Senator Jack Latvala exposed Kelli Stargel’s lack of any true understanding of SB 1714 and, with time short in the committee meeting, he clearly felt […]

By |April 10th, 2014|Blog|3 Comments

Update on Senate Bill SPB 7120

We talked last week about SPB 7120, which received consideration from the Senate Regulated Industries Committee yesterday.

Early Wednesday morning (the day that the bill received consideration), Senator Audrey Gibson (representing a portion of Duval County) filed an amendment that would have caused 7120 to follow the amended language of HB 1329 (which essentially followed the previously filed HB 7075). Gibson seemingly filed the amendment in an attempt to create consistency with the House Bill. She spoke for a bit on Wednesday and noted the importance of the craft beer industry in Florida and noted its ability to revitalize neighborhoods. Stories of such revitalization have made news across the country (look to Oakland, portions of Kentucky and Cleveland for example). Gibson was right, but she withdrew her amendment early in the process after apparently realizing/determining that any language to be added to the bill would need work. It’s not the […]

By |March 27th, 2014|Blog|4 Comments

Big Beer Bill Filed in Senate

The Committee on Regulated Industries has filed a proposed committee bill (SPB 7120) in the Senate, backed, presumably, by Big Beer (generally the Florida Beer Wholesalers Association who appear beholden to Anheuser Busch).  Florida Senate President Don Gaetz acknowledged  earlier that “one of very best friends is an Anheuser-Busch distributor” and that he will vote however his buddy tells him to vote.  He was unable to explain any of the issues or provide any further reasoning for why he would back a bill created to stifle a burgeoning industry in Florida.  He did tell the AP writer the following: “I don’t know”. It’s true. He doesn’t. Gaetz humorously vowed earlier to encourage ethical government decisions (oops). 

The Committee on Regulated Industries includes Maria Lorts Sachs, who filed an amendment to kill last year’s growler bill.  Her amendment last year would have restricted growler […]

By |March 21st, 2014|Blog|4 Comments

Florida Beer Compromise?

With the legislative session underway and the insulting HB 1329 filed, now is probably a good time to look at the other malt beverage bills out there to see what they are up to. HB 1329, filed on Monday, may have the affect of being so utterly ridiculous that it diverts attention from the other malt beverage bills. Those bills are likely to get some edits and turn into “compromises”.  HB 7075 may be that compromise. The folks behind the drafting of the Big Beer Bill may hope they can have people “look over there” while unfavorable changes are made to the other malt beverage bills.

Here is a rundown:

HB 7075 – The “Compromise” Bill to HB 1329? (filed last Friday, February 28. 2014)

  • Allows self-distribution of up to 3,000 gallons
  • Allows for a “taproom” on the brewery premises without the need for a separate vendor’s license
  • Brewers could sell their own […]
By |March 6th, 2014|Blog|0 Comments

Trademark Series: Beer and Wine

In the most recent issue of American Brewer Magazine, I mentioned that the fact that a mark is used and registered for wine or distilled spirits does not necessarily bang a death knell for a craft brewer’s ability to use a similar or identical mark.  I’ve recently discussed geographically descriptive trademarks and refusals of beer marks based on a likelihood of confusion with clothing items.  This will discuss why a similar, or even identical, mark registered for wine or distilled spirits should not (and does not) mean a mark for beer and/or brewery services cannot register and acquire nationwide trademark rights.

The Refusal:

The USPTO will generally issue a refusal that compares the marks (how they look, sound, etc.) and then compares the similarity of the goods. The goods comparison generally goes as follows:

 BeerAndWineRefusalSample

The X-Search database evidence that […]

By |January 22nd, 2014|Blog|1 Comment